Crime Statistics For South Oxfordshire And Vale Of White Horse Released

This is a message sent via Thames Valley Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Thames Valley Police

Message sent by Helen Thorne (Police, Communications Officer, Thames Valley)

Thames Valley Police has released crime statistics which cover the past twelve months.

The latest figures show that there were 138,710 crimes reported across Oxfordshire, Berkshire and Buckinghamshire from 1 April 2016 until 31 March 2017. This is a 7.2% increase to the previous year (2015/16) where there were 129,449 reported crimes within the same time frame.

Of these 9,895 crimes were reported in South Oxfordshire and Vale of White Horse Local Police Area (LPA), a rise of 4.0% on last year.

The increase in crime reports is reflected nationally (ONS Crime Survey of England and Wales ), and is largely attributed to improvements in compliance with National Crime Recording Standards, following recommendations made by HMIC in 2014.

Overall crime levels in Thames Valley still remain low compared with five and ten years ago. There were 66,976 fewer crimes recorded in this timeframe compared with five years ago (205,686), and 8,357 fewer recorded offences compared with ten years ago (147,067).

Following the release of the figures, Superintendent Rory Freeman, LPA Commander for South and Vale said: “Whilst we have seen some increase in reports of crime this year, this is similar to the national trend.

“Despite this, South Oxfordshire and Vale of White Horse continues to be a very safe place to live and work. The future is challenging and our priority is constantly trying to match the right resources to our areas of greatest harm and demand whilst seeking to maintain and enhance public confidence in policing.

“Our officers work hard with communities to prevent crime and we are encouraging people to take simple steps that will protect them, their property and businesses. Campaigns such as #Protectyourworld in the Autumn and our February rural crime campaign are good examples of how we have raised awareness and confidence in our communities to report incidents to us .

“I would like to take this opportunity to thank my staff and our partner agencies for their hard work over the last year and most importantly extend my gratitude to our communities for their continued support.”

Attached files
File name File size
South and Vale crime statistics 2016-2017.pdf 56.8 KB

South Oxfordshire only crime statistics 2016-2017.pdf 56.7 KB

Vale of White Horse only crime statistics 2016-2017.pdf 56.6 KB

LGA responds to latest delayed discharges figures

“No one’s elderly parent, grandparents or friends should be left unnecessarily in a hospital bed, when they could be treated in the comfort and dignity of their own home.”

Responding to delayed discharges figures for February 2017 published today by NHS England, Vice Chair of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, Cllr Linda Thomas, said:

“No one’s elderly parent, grandparents or friends should be left unnecessarily in a hospital bed, when they could be treated in the comfort and dignity of their own home.

“Councils are absolutely committed to reducing the level of delayed transfers of care from the NHS and are working with providers and hospitals to help reduce pressures on health services.

“Across the country nearly six out of 10 people delayed in hospital are unable to leave because they require further NHS services, with around a third awaiting support from council social care.

“The scale of underfunding councils have faced in recent years is placing the care provider market under huge pressure, making it more difficult to discharge people from hospital back to their homes and communities.

“But while reducing delayed transfers of care is a significant challenge for both councils and the NHS, this is by no means the only issue facing health and social care, and it’s important it does not become the basis for which overall performance is judged.

“The LGA has worked hard to highlight the significant pressures facing adult social care and secure desperately-needed new government funding for the system. It also works to support member councils tackle these challenges, for example working with local care providers to ensure there are out of hospital beds to meet needs, and using telecare to better support people to recover in their own homes.

“The new funding for social care and the £2 billion announced over the next three years in the Budget is a significant step towards helping councils plug some of the social care funding gaps they face in the coming years.

“However, short-term pressures remain and they further emphasise the need to reform and fully fund the current social care system and find a long-term solution to the social care funding crisis.

“The Government’s Green Paper provides the opportunity to begin a much-needed meaningful national conversation about how, as a society, we should best support people of all ages with care and support needs in our communities.”

source